Competition vs. Self-motivation

Seth Godin’s advice on this issue is to “run your own race.”  Godin continues, “the rear view mirror is one of the most effective motivational tools ever created.”

I would say that it is also one of the most seductive sources of motivation. If you listen to interviews with elite athletes– especially those who participate in individual rather than team sports– you’ll hear phrases such as: “playing my own game,” “staying focused,” or “performing at my level.”  It is common for people (or athletes) to perform better with competition, however, you will be subject to your competition showing up in their best form.

Self motivation is and always will be the most important form of motivation. Driving with your eyes on the rear view mirror is exhausting. It’s easier than ever to measure your performance against others, but if it’s not helping you with your mission, stop.  Read Seth’s post here.

Run your own race.

Traits of Good Leaders?

Rachel Farrell at CareerBuilder.com posted “23 traits of good leaders.”  The list includes input from five leadership professionals. Here is a compilation of the 23 traits provided by these professionals:

  1. Honesty
  2. Focus
  3. Passion
  4. Respect Read more

“Does that make sense?”

In his Harvard Business Review Blog Network post, Jerry Weissman makes the point that for many people asking “does that make sense?” during a presentation has become a filler.  Other well know examples of fillers include: “like,” “you know,” “to be honest,” and the all too frequent and dreaded “um.”  Jerry is an expert at coaching business people to be successful presenters.  He has published several books on the subject including the  most recent book Presentations in Action: 80 Memorable Presentation Lessons from the Masters (FT Press: 2011).

I agree with Jerry’s point which is essentially that asking your audience “does that make sense?” can convey. . .  Read more