Everyone Has Something to Contribute

In her Wall Street Journal Online article, Reverse Mentoring Cracks Workplace, Leslie Kwoh writes about “reverse mentoring” whereby older, more experienced employees are paired with younger employees who serve as their mentors.  This approach can be especially helpful to teach older employees about the latest technology such as Skype and iPhone apps and popular social media tools such as Facebook or Twitter.  The article cites several Fortune 500 companies that have successfully implemented reverse mentoring programs including GE, Ogilvy & Mather, Hewlett-Packard Co., Cisco Systems Inc. Read more

Play More Golf to Increase Your Compensation by 17%

A recent Economist.com article, espouses the virtues of golf as it relates to conducting business.

Dilbert.com

The article includes quotes from the CEO of Wentworth Golf Club, considered one of the top 100 in the world, who highlights several benefits of the game including, “. . . golf is a fine test of character. When you do business with people, you need to know more about them.”

The most interesting part of this article Read more

Top Eight Rules of Networking

Networking is a critical skill for a successful career.  When you learn to do it well, you will enjoy yourself.  If not, networking can be excruciating for you and the people around you.   Approach networking with the idea that you want to help others and you’ll be amazed at how much you receive in return.

Kelly Eggers of Dow Jones offers her version of the do’s and don’t of networking:

  1. Have a Solid Introduction
  2. Don’t Confuse People with Your Pitch
  3. Don’t Tell a Sob Story
  4. Spend More Time Listening Than Talking
  5. Avoid Being Socially Inept
  6. Don’t Overstay Your Welcome
  7. Hand out Your Business Card, Not Your Resume
  8. Follow Up and Through

Read the full article on FINS.com.

Downsides of Digital Conflict Resolution

In his recent HBR blog post, Anthony Tjan,  CEO, Managing Partner and Founder of the venture capital firm Cue Ball and vice chairman of the advisory firm Parthenon, discusses the downside of using email for “digital conflict resolution” and highlights three of the problems that often result from pressing <SEND>.
1. It is hard to get the EQ (emotional intelligence) right in email.
2. Email and text often promote reactive responses.
3. Email prolongs debate. Read more

How to Adopt a Sales Mindset

Harvey Mackay, author of The Mackay MBA of Selling in the Real World (Portfolio Penguin, Penguin Group (USA) Inc., 2011) and the New York Times #1 bestsellers Swim With The Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive, offers thirteen simple rules for becoming your own sales superstar.

Mackay’s rules apply to both business owners and professionals who are managing their own careers.  Every professional must know how to sell— whether you are selling your ideas to your boss, providing support for an internal customer or pitching your policy position to a colleague.   Outstanding sales skills are essential for being an successful professional.

Here is an overview of Mackay’s rules.

1. Stay hungry.
2. Never compromise your integrity.
3. Stay positive. Read more

Do You Have Executive Presence?

Executive presence refers to one’s ability to look and act like an executive or a leader.  Think of an actor auditioning for the leading role in a movie– he has to look like and act like the character in order to be credible and convince the director.  Even if you are not an executive today, this is an important skill to master.

“Executive presence” is a broad term that includes your body language, personal appearance and dress, your mannerisms and gestures, the way you speak and the way you shake hands when greeting someone.  If you are not convinced that having an executive presence is important, you should consider that companies such as Intel and Morgan Stanley have launched training programs focused on these skills for their employees.  And these days, large companies don’t invest money in teaching their employees skills unless it is important.

Executive coaches can be helpful by providing a non-biased assessment of your executive presence and methods to improve these skills.  Start by observing your co-workers, managers and other business leaders in your organization.  Can you identify a few people with an executive presence that you admire and want to imitate?

Read “How to Look and Act Like a Leader” by Joann S. Lublin on the WSJ.com for additional resources.

Career-ology Publishes Free Tools

Today, Career-ology published two free resource available.

The first tool, Overview-LinkedIn, provides an overview of the key features and functions of LinkedIn, tips on getting started and a list of additional resources for training.  LinkedIn is most popular professional social media site with more than 100 million members.  Are you on LinkedIn?  If not, you should be.

The second tool, Interview & Meeting Prep, can be used to prepare for an interview, a business meeting or networking situation with colleagues, customers or clients using popular social media tools and websites.  The information you collect will help you to establish a meaningful connection with the people you meet.  By learning more about the person with whom you are meeting, you can increase the likelihood of finding points of common interest.

To download these free tools (.pdf) from Career-ology, click on the Resources page.

Competition vs. Self-motivation

Seth Godin’s advice on this issue is to “run your own race.”  Godin continues, “the rear view mirror is one of the most effective motivational tools ever created.”

I would say that it is also one of the most seductive sources of motivation. If you listen to interviews with elite athletes– especially those who participate in individual rather than team sports– you’ll hear phrases such as: “playing my own game,” “staying focused,” or “performing at my level.”  It is common for people (or athletes) to perform better with competition, however, you will be subject to your competition showing up in their best form.

Self motivation is and always will be the most important form of motivation. Driving with your eyes on the rear view mirror is exhausting. It’s easier than ever to measure your performance against others, but if it’s not helping you with your mission, stop.  Read Seth’s post here.

Run your own race.