Career-ology Publishes Free Tools

Today, Career-ology published two free resource available.

The first tool, Overview-LinkedIn, provides an overview of the key features and functions of LinkedIn, tips on getting started and a list of additional resources for training.  LinkedIn is most popular professional social media site with more than 100 million members.  Are you on LinkedIn?  If not, you should be.

The second tool, Interview & Meeting Prep, can be used to prepare for an interview, a business meeting or networking situation with colleagues, customers or clients using popular social media tools and websites.  The information you collect will help you to establish a meaningful connection with the people you meet.  By learning more about the person with whom you are meeting, you can increase the likelihood of finding points of common interest.

To download these free tools (.pdf) from Career-ology, click on the Resources page.

Competition vs. Self-motivation

Seth Godin’s advice on this issue is to “run your own race.”  Godin continues, “the rear view mirror is one of the most effective motivational tools ever created.”

I would say that it is also one of the most seductive sources of motivation. If you listen to interviews with elite athletes– especially those who participate in individual rather than team sports– you’ll hear phrases such as: “playing my own game,” “staying focused,” or “performing at my level.”  It is common for people (or athletes) to perform better with competition, however, you will be subject to your competition showing up in their best form.

Self motivation is and always will be the most important form of motivation. Driving with your eyes on the rear view mirror is exhausting. It’s easier than ever to measure your performance against others, but if it’s not helping you with your mission, stop.  Read Seth’s post here.

Run your own race.

“Does that make sense?”

In his Harvard Business Review Blog Network post, Jerry Weissman makes the point that for many people asking “does that make sense?” during a presentation has become a filler.  Other well know examples of fillers include: “like,” “you know,” “to be honest,” and the all too frequent and dreaded “um.”  Jerry is an expert at coaching business people to be successful presenters.  He has published several books on the subject including the  most recent book Presentations in Action: 80 Memorable Presentation Lessons from the Masters (FT Press: 2011).

I agree with Jerry’s point which is essentially that asking your audience “does that make sense?” can convey. . .  Read more

The Best of Seth

Seth Godin’s wisdom of the day. . . here is the conclusion of the post:

Reading every single trade journal, for example, or understanding the marketing, engineering and sales of your field–there are countless ways to go deep instead of merely paying lip service to the current flavor of the moment.” Read Seth’s entire (short) blog post here.

5 “Sticky” Interview Tactics

Nick Corcodilos (a.k.a. Ask the Headhunter) provides five “sticky” interview tactics which will help set you apart in today’s ultra-competitive job market.  Read the full article.  Here is a preview:

  1. Attach yourself to the work.
  2. Let the manager see you as an employee.
  3. Inspire employees to talk about you.
  4. Inspire employers to talk about you.
  5. Be there now.

So, who is Nick and why should you read this article?  Good question. . . Read more

Earn that Promotion — Become an MVP!

In his blog, John Keyser, outlines principals for success in your career.  Here is his list– the last bullet point summarizes the other points:    Become the MVP in the eyes of everyone for all you do.

  • Be positive, enthusiastic, and a source of positive energy.
  • Make things happen. Don’t wait. Contribute ideas. When you see something that should be done, do it or make the suggestion to the appropriate person.
  • Be authentic, yourself, and honest with people. Read more

70% of Recruiters Have Rejected Candidates Because of Online Content!

This 8-page article from the NY Times is a comprehensive look at all of the issues related to online privacy. There some critical information for job seekers.  For those who want the short version, read the excerpt below:

“According to a recent survey by Microsoft, 75 percent of U.S. recruiters and human-resource professionals report that their companies require them to do online research about candidates, and many use a range of sites when scrutinizing applicants — including search engines, social-networking sites, photo- and video-sharing sites, personal websites and blogs, Twitter and online-gaming sites. Seventy percent of U.S. recruiters report that they have rejected candidates because of information found online, like photos and discussion-board conversations and membership in controversial groups.”