Thank You Notes Increase Your Chance of Success

This is from a national survey of more than 2,800 U.S. employers, conducted by CareerBuilder.

  • More than one-in-five (22 percent) hiring managers say they are less likely to hire a candidate if they don’t send a thank-you note after an interview;
  • 86 percent say it shows a lack of follow-through;
  • 56 percent say it sends the message that they aren’t really serious about the opportunity;
  • 89 percent of hiring managers say it is OK to send a thank-you note in the form of an e-mail, with half saying it is actually the way they prefer to receive them;
  • IT hiring managers are the most eager to receive e-mail, rather than written thank you notes;
  • The majority of those in the financial services like hand-written and USPS delivered notes better, but say that e-mail is still acceptable.

Thank you notes are not just for interviews.  Invest 5 minutes to stand out from the crowd after meeting a customer, prospect, mentor or business partner.  If speed is critical (i.e., timing is an issue) such as an interview or a competitive sales situation, send an email and a hand written note.  If speed is not critical, always opt for the hand written note.

So what should be included in a thank you note? . . .  Read the full CareerBuilder post here.

Empathy Communicates Trust

When I first started reading Peter Bregman’s blog post on the Harvard Business Review, I appreciated the advice he offered as the father of a 3 year old. I tucked this away in the mental file for the times my son has a similar experience.

As the article continued, I wasn’t sure how Bregman would turn this anecdote about a nine-year old girl who was disqualified from her swim meet into a business lesson which would be applicable to the workplace.  And in two simple sentences he does it:

“Empathy communicates trust. And people perform best when they feel trusted.”

It is that simple.  Leadership is about being authentic and there is nothing more authentic than practicing empathy with others.

The Last 10%

In his blog today, Seth Godin talks about the effort that is required to attain the last ten percent– the final push to the summit!  Great advice for all your professional (and personal) endeavors.