Why Networking is Important in Your Career

Like any good investment, the hours you put into active networking will pay o well in your future and the bene ts are likely to multiply over time. Some of the many bene ts that may be ex- changed among people in your professional network include:

  • Job opportunities
  • Professional recommendations
  • New customers, clients, investors, advisors
  • New business partners
  • Joint-venture opportunities
  • Recommendations for professional services such as accountants, lawyers, graphic artists, or web developers
  • News, trends, and important events in your industry or business community
  • Referrals to other people who you may want to join your network
  • Recommendations for personal service providers such as doctors, restaurants, vacation spots, and more.

You’ll notice that I said above, “the many benefits that may be exchanged among people.” I didn’t say, “the many bene ts that you may receive.” A professional network always involves give and take. And give usually comes first.

Developing Your Professional Relationships: The Key to Your Professional Success

Developing your own professional network will lead to more success than almost anything else you do in your career.

Developing relationships with people who want to and are able to help you is a worthwhile investment of your time and resources. These are the people who will help when you need it most. is is a long-term investment of your time in building relationships with other people. Your professional network will be developed and maintained over your entire career.

Your professional network will be developed and maintained over your entire career. Actively participate in your network and help others, as you would like others to help you. Maintain these business relationships in good times and bad—while you are fully employed, unemployed, or in between. A strong professional network is as valuable to a  first-year employee as it is to the CEO. It is as important to someone working in a tech start-up in Silicon Valley as it is to the person teaching elementary school. Developing your own professional network will lead to more success than almost anything else you do in your career. It is the key to your professional success.

NAME TAGS DON’T DESERVE MUCH THOUGHT, RIGHT? WRONG!

At a networking event, you will meet people for the first time and you want to give them the maximum opportunity to remember your name. Attach your nametag very high on your right lapel. Do this because you are usually extending your right hand to shake, so that side of your body will also be slightly extended forward. This makes it easier for the person to read your nametag without having to look across your body.

The Key for Your Success

Professional success in every industry is a team effort. Who is on your team?

Most successful people will say that networking has played an important role in their careers. I would challenge anyone who claims that his or her success was completely self-determined. No matter what your career, a professional network can be extremely helpful.

Actors, athletes, artists, and musicians, in addition to business people, civil servants, politicians, medical professionals, lawyers, teachers, doctors, and not-for-pro t professionals all bene t from the relationships nurtured by a robust professional network.

Professional success in every industry is a team e ort. Your team or your professional network may include people within your own organization, your industry, or related industries. It may also include your business partners, former colleagues, col- lege classmates, and people who belong to the same professional associations.

LinkedIn Official Blog

There is no better source of information about the most important professional networking platform in the world than the LinkedIn Official Blog. If you want to learn more about LinkedIn, go right to the source. There are hundreds of blog posts arranged by topic and searchable by keyword.

Reading List: How to Really Used LinkedIn by Jan Vermeiren

 

Why read the book? This book is written for a broad audience—from the LinkedIn novice to the advanced user—and includes instruction on using the tool and detailed strategies for creating your profile, building your own professional network, and engaging with groups. You can download a full copy of the book for free and access tools, videos, webinars, and self-assessment tools.

Reading List – How to Win Friends & Influence People in the Digital Age by Dale Carnegie & Associates

Why read this book?

So much more than about networking, this book is an up- date of the original classic written by Dale Carnegie in 1936. The original title is often cited as the book that launched the entire self-help genre—currently an $11 billion industry, according to New York Magazine.

Adapted from my book, Career-ology: The Art and Science of a Successful Career, Chapter 3: Professional Networking. Click here to download 2 chapters of the book for free. Available on Amazon today.

Reading List – The Go-Giver: A Little Story About a Powerful Business Idea by Bob Burg and John David Mann

Why read this book? This is a superbly written parable whose main message is that in business, as in life, it is better to give than to receive. The Go-Giver is both inspirational and aspirational as you build your professional network. I can’t recommend it highly enough.

Adapted from my new book, Career-ology: The Art and Science of a Successful Career, Chapter 3: Professional Networking. Click here to download 2 chapters of the book for free! Available on Amazon today.

Are you on LinkedIn?

This is a great NYT article about the power of LinkedIn and the many uses of social media including launching a new business, advancing your career and finding a new job.

Are you on LinkedIn?  You should [must]  be.

Business Cards for Networking

Business cards are a vital part of a networking event. Make sure you bring double the number that you think you will need. Due to resource constraints, some companies don’t issue business cards to all of their employees so you’ll need to create one for yourself.

If you are in this situation, visit one of many online resources to design your own cards. This can often be done for as little as $10 and they will usually arrive within one week.

If you create your own cards, don’t use your organization’s name, logo, or your work contact details.

Select a good quality cardstock (at least a sixty-pound cover stock), as some online stores will provide you with cards that feel a bit flimsy once they arrive. Some nice features to consider include embossed print, metallic ink, and other options. For most industries, select a basic font with black ink on a white card. For more creative industries, you can choose many more interesting fonts, designs, and colors.

Include the following information on your professional business card:

  • Your name
  • A personal phone number (Be sure that your voicemail is appropriately professional.)
  • Your personal email address
  • Your occupation or job function
  • Your industry (or combine with above, such as: “IT Sales,” or “Federal Government Grant Writer”)

If you don’t have business cards with you at a networking event, it may signal that you are not prepared. The physical exchange of a piece of cardstock still dominates the networking scene in most industries. During networking events where there are people of different generations, exchanging cards instead of relying on a smartphone app is always a reliable approach.

The Business Card Exchange Ritual
There have been many words dedicated to the proper method Read more