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Business Cards for Networking

Business cards are a vital part of a networking event. Make sure you bring double the number that you think you will need. Due to resource constraints, some companies don’t issue business cards to all of their employees so you’ll need to create one for yourself.

If you are in this situation, visit one of many online resources to design your own cards. This can often be done for as little as $10 and they will usually arrive within one week.

If you create your own cards, don’t use your organization’s name, logo, or your work contact details.

Select a good quality cardstock (at least a sixty-pound cover stock), as some online stores will provide you with cards that feel a bit flimsy once they arrive. Some nice features to consider include embossed print, metallic ink, and other options. For most industries, select a basic font with black ink on a white card. For more creative industries, you can choose many more interesting fonts, designs, and colors.

Include the following information on your professional business card:

  • Your name
  • A personal phone number (Be sure that your voicemail is appropriately professional.)
  • Your personal email address
  • Your occupation or job function
  • Your industry (or combine with above, such as: “IT Sales,” or “Federal Government Grant Writer”)

If you don’t have business cards with you at a networking event, it may signal that you are not prepared. The physical exchange of a piece of cardstock still dominates the networking scene in most industries. During networking events where there are people of different generations, exchanging cards instead of relying on a smartphone app is always a reliable approach.

The Business Card Exchange Ritual
There have been many words dedicated to the proper method Read more

Godin Makes the Case for “Career-ology”

In his article, “If You’re An Average Worker, You’re Going Straight To The Bottom,” Seth Godin makes the case for being proactive about your career and professional development which is what Career-ology is all about!

. . . if you’re different somehow and have made yourself unique, people will find you and pay you more, Godin says.

Instead of waiting around for someone to tell you that you matter, take your career into your own hands. In other words, don’t wait for someone else to pick you and pick yourself! If you have a book, you don’t need a publisher to approve you, you can publish it yourself. It’s no longer about waiting for some big corporation to choose you. We’ve arrived at an age where you choose yourself.

Thanks again for the wise words, Seth.